Waterfall and hiking guide to Halls Falls Tasmania. Enjoy an easy, yet scenic hike to this multi-tiered waterfall on the Groom River.

Halls Falls is a set of multiple cascading waterfalls located on the Groom River near Pyengana. This short waterfall circuit features several viewing points of the cascades, as well as a rock-pool area and an historic, 19th century weir.

We visiting this waterfall after some heavy rainfall. As a result, the photos on this blog show it in full-force and they may or may not be flowing as hard when you visit.

Where is Halls Falls?

As mentioned, the walking track to Halls Falls is located near the village of Pyengana in the Tasmanian north-east. This is approximately 22 kilometres from St Helens or just over 145 kilometres from Launceston.

How to Get to Halls Falls

To get to the Halls Falls Trailhead, you’ll need to make your way towards Pyengana on the Tasman Highway (A3). You will find the waterfall carpark roughly 1.2KM down a dirt road known as Anchor Road. This road is on the corner of a small bend and can be easily missed. However, there are signs indicating the way to the falls.

The dirt road (Anchor Road) is a little rough but it’s only a short way to the trailhead car park. Our big van made it there without any trouble.

HALLS FALLS HIKE TASMANIA, TRAILHEAD
Track information hut at the start of the Halls Falls track

If you’re looking for more waterfalls in Tasmania, don’t miss my comprehensive Tasmania Waterfall Guide, covering 26 of my favourite in the island state!

The Halls Falls Circuit

Hiking Distance: 2.5 KM return
Duration: 1 – 1.5 hours
Difficulty: Easy

The Halls Falls circuit is a relatively short and easy walk on a wide, well-graded dirt track. The track is mostly an in-and-out trail but you will have the option of taking a loop back to the car park from about halfway to the falls.

The flora here is a little drier than what you might find at the nearby St Columba Falls. There is a good mix of Aussie eucalypts and temperate rainforest myrtle trees and tall man ferns along the length of the track.

HALLS FALLS RAINFOREST WALK

Other than the main waterfall, there are a few highlights along the way that are worth checking out too.

Halls Falls Map
Below I’ve included a basic map showing the route and distances to each attraction on the Halls Falls circuit.

Halls Falls hiking map

Halls Falls Tasmania – Waterfall Lookout

Less than one kilometre into the hike and you’ll arrive at the main waterfall lookout. Truthfully, I found myself a little disappointed by this lookout. This was because it was a little tricky to see the scale of it due to the surrounding trees and shrubs.

HALLS FALLS WATERFALL TASMANIA

Walking Down to the Base of the Bottom Tier

Thankfully, there is a relatively steep, yet short track down to the “rockpools” below. Here, you can admire the bottom-tier waterfall up-close.

HALLS FALLS WALKING TRACK
Dirt track down to the bottom falls (rockpools)

This spot is labelled as “Rock Pools” on the Halls Falls map above. However, as you can see from the photos following heavy rain, there was no chance we were going to take a swim in these pools.

HALLS FALLS ROCKPOOLS TASMANIA
HALLS FALLS WATERFALL ROCKPOOLS

Top-Tier Falls

After snapping some shots of the bottom waterfall, we continued back up the track and onwards to the next waterfall at Halls Falls. This was really just a short, easy walk with only a little decline at the end to get to the waterfall.

HALLS FALLS TASMANIA

The scale of the torrential rain that the area experienced was even more evident as soon as we made it here. We found trees and heavy logs smashed up against the banks of the Groom River just beyond the falls.

WATERFALL HIKING IN TASMANIA AT HALLS FALLS

19th Century Weir

The last attraction on the Halls Falls hike is the 19th Century weir. This man-made cascade and large, pooled area was used my 19th Century loggers to control the water level on the Groom River.

HALLS FALLS WEIR TASMANIA

After stopping briefly, we found that there was another track that continued on beyond the weir, unmentioned on the Tasmania Parks map. We followed it for about a kilometre and ended up further upstream.

Here, the water flow was much calmer, and the orange banks were lined with beautiful, towering ferns. Whilst perhaps not an official attraction, I do recommend checking it out if you wish to continue on a little further.

More Adventures in Tasmania

Are you looking for more hikes, waterfalls and adventure attractions in Tasmania? Other than the Halls Falls hike, I’ve also written about several other epic locations in Tasmania! Make sure to check out some of my favourites below.

HALLS FALLS WATERFALL TASMANIA

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