A complete waterfall guide to visiting Montezuma Falls Tasmania, the tallest in the state! Includes information about how to get here, details on the Montezuma Falls hike as well as photos and an account for what to expect.

Yes, Montezuma Falls is the highest permanent waterfall in Tasmania. This incredible, sleepy giant is located on Tasmania’s Wild West Coast and is accessible via an easy yet very scenic forest track.

In this waterfall guide, I hope to answer all of your questions about visiting Montezuma Falls in Tasmania. I’ll include details about how to get here including the hike and post some awesome photos from my trip.

About Montezuma Falls in Tasmania

Montezuma Falls height: 104 metres

Montezuma Falls is a multi-tiered waterfall found at the end of an easy 1.5 hour forest hike along a historic former tramway. The area is managed by “Sustainable Timber Tasmania”, (formerly Forestry Tasmania) but is open to the public.

Unfortunately, due to a long history of mining in the region surrounding Rosebery, the rivers and creeks are contaminated with heavy metals and are not safe for drinking. I found this to be a particularly tragic reality considering just how wild and bio-diverse this region is.

MONTEZUMA FALLS TASMANIA

If you’re looking for more waterfalls in Tasmania, don’t miss my comprehensive Tasmania Waterfall Guide, covering 26 of my favourite in the island state!

Where is Montezuma Falls?

The waterfall track is accessible via Williamsford, which is approximately two kilometres south of Rosebery in Tasmania’s west. The trailhead is approximately 63 kilometres from Strahan or 35 kilometres from Tullah. This area is mostly a mining region, so the towns are quite small and remote.

You’ll also likely lose reception on the way to Montezuma Falls after passing Rosebery. Therefore, I suggest saving this blog or loading the map directions below beforehand.

Google Maps Pin: “Montezuma Falls Trailhead”

How to Get Here?

The easiest way to navigate to Montezuma Falls in Tasmania is to plug in the GPS coordinates or Google Maps pin above. However, if you prefer guided directions, I’ve also got you covered.

Whether you’re coming from the West Coast or in the direction from Tullah, you’ll want to first head to the western side of Rosebery on the Murchison Highway (A10). Just outside of Rosebery, head towards Williamsford Road and continue up this steep, winding road for a few kilometres. There are signs along the way that indicate the directions to Montezuma Falls. But, basically you’ll want to stay on Williamsford Road until you see a sign to pull over on your right near Scotts Creek.

Here, you’ll find a huge, cleared car park beside the trailhead with good signage and accommodating 25+ cars.

TRAILHEAD FOR MONTEZUMA FALLS

WIlliamsford Road is unsealed for much of the journey. However, the road is in good condition and passes private residences so you shouldn’t have to worry in good weather, even if you have a big van or camper.

Tip: There’s a small fuel station in Rosebery which would be wise to fill up at since you won’t find another until Strahan or Queenstown.

MOUNT MURCHISON FROM TULLEY, TASMANIA
TULLEY TASMANIA
Wild Scenic Roads near Tulley

Guided Tour Option

Whilst being quite a popular waterfall in Tasmania, Montezuma is quite remote. Consequently, you won’t find many guided tours that visit this far-reaching corner of Tasmania. In saying that, if you find yourself in Hobart, there is a very high-rated 5-day tour that includes a visit at Montezuma, as well as many of the other major highlights in Tasmania.

Tip: If you don’t have your own vehicle in Tassie yet, make sure to compare prices on RentalCars.com and on CarNextDoor to get much better deals than direct bookings.

Otherwise, if you’re visiting Tasmania’s Wild West without a car, check out the below hand-picked must-do activities in the region.


SELF-DRIVE GUIDE TO: The Tarkine Drive


The Montezuma Falls Hike

Hiking Distance: 11 kilometres return
Duration: 3 hours return
Elevation: 120 metres total elevation gain (gradual and mostly flat)
Difficulty: Easy

The Montezuma Falls walk begins at the trailhead mentioned in the directions above. It is mostly flat, with a wide track following the old North East Dundas Tramway. There are signs the entire way and it is extremely easy to follow.

While this waterfall hike is a little long at 11 kilometres return, I’ve rated it as easy as it really is a walk in the park. There were a couple of awesome elderly ladies that we met along the way who I’d say were in their 70s and they didn’t seem to have a problem with the Montezuma Falls hike at all.

MONTEZUMA FALLS HIKE

Along the way, you will cross a couple of old wooden bridges and pass through narrowly carved passages through the mountains. While you are constantly reminded of the mining heritage, the nature is quite breathtaking. Beautiful rainforest consisting of large leatherwoods, myrtles, giant tree ferns and sassafras dominates both sides of the track.

Check out my Strava for a detailed representation of the trail.

SCENIC LIGHT RAYS ON THE MONTEZUMA FALLS WALK
SCENIC LIGHT RAYS ON THE MONTEZUMA FALLS WALK, NORTH EAST DUNDAS TRAMWAY
SMALL WATERFALL ON THE OLD MONTEZUMA FALLS WALK
TASMANIAN FOREST
NORTH EAST DUNDAS TRAMWAY

ALSO NEARBY: Philosopher Falls


About the Famous Montezuma Falls Suspension Bridge

Approximately 5 kilometres along the Montezuma Falls walk, you’ll come across the famous suspension bridge. This bridge is one of the most impressive I’ve seen in Tasmania and makes for some great photo opportunities directly adjacent the waterfall.

Unfortunately, the Montezuma Falls suspension bridge has suffered some damage due to flooding and tree fall recently. As a result, the bridge is closed. I’m not sure if there are any immediate plans by “Sustainable Timber Tasmania” to rectify the bridge. If you visit and it has reopened, please let me know so that I can update this article!

Don’t worry though, you don’t need to cross the bridge to reach the 104 metre Montezuma Falls. We stopped by the bridge, snapped some photos and continued on to the base of the multi-tiered forest giant.

MONTEZUMA FALLS SUSPENSION BRIDGE

Arriving at the Base of Montezuma Falls

Walk just a few hundred metres up from the suspension bridge and you’ll find yourself at the base of Montezuma Falls, Tasmania’s highest permanent waterfall.

The view from the bottom is great, with plenty of space to put down your pack and take some photos. Looking up, Montezuma Falls spills down the steep cliff in several stepped tiers and finishing on top of a few large boulders.

MONTEZUMA FALLS TASMANIA
MONTEZUMA FALLS TASMANIA

Depending on the season, this waterfall can range from a gentle pour to a powerful waterfall which is almost impossible to get close to.

When we visited Montezuma Falls in winter, we were fortunate enough to find it somewhere in between However, while we did wait around for it to clear, the fog was so thick that we couldn’t make out the top of the waterfall. Either way, we were really happy as it created a beautiful, moody scene.

Mining Tunnels

Less than a kilometre on the way back (or on the way to the waterfall), keep an eye out for the entrance to an old mining tunnel. It’s possible to walk into this claustrophobic tunnel chasm, which ends at a barrier about 10 metres in.

OLD MINING TUNNEL ON THE MONTEZUMA FALLS TRACK, TASMANIA

More: the Montezuma Falls 4WD Track

In this waterfall guide I focused on the trail hike to Montezuma Falls. However, there is also a 4WD track providing an alternative route to reach the waterfall.

They say that this particular 4WD track is quite difficult to cover and that if it has been raining, don’t even think about it. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to check out this section but if you are interested, my friends from The Caravan of Courage have recorded a Vlog as they tackled it on an electric motorbike. I’ve embedded it below!

Where to Stay In Tasmania’s West

The most popular place to stay in Western Tasmania is in Strahan. There’s just so much to see and do in this region and it’s definitely worth at least a couple of days. Activities like the Gordon River Cruise and the rack and pinion railway are must-dos when travelling in Tasmania.

Below are a couple of my recommended places to stay in nearby Strahan, as well as one in Queenstown.

Wheelhouse Apartments – Strahan
Unique apartments located in Strahan, each with river or lake views. These apartments are some of the best-rated online for Western Tasmania!

Check availability & price for your dates at Wheelhouse Apartments

The Boat House – Strahan
Another Strahan favourite, this affordable holiday accommodation option features river views and includes a kitchen and living area.

Check availability & price for your dates at the Boat House

Penghana B&B – Queenstown
If you’re after the best place to stay in Queenstown, check out this 1898 National Trust Mansion B&B which is just 2 minutes’ drive from the Wilderness Railway & the Heritage Tours.

Check availability & price for your dates at the Penghana B&B

EXPLORE TASMANIA: MORE EPIC ADVENTURE AND TRAVEL IDEAS

That wraps up this quick guide to exploring Montezuma Falls Tasmania. If you enjoyed this waterfall hike, then I’m sure you’ll love some of the other epic and off-the-beaten-path spots to explore in the area. I’ve spent several months photographing and documenting some of the best, so make sure to check them out!

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